What is your definition of a good poker player?

Amen. I agree 100%. Win with your cards, not bluffing with your chip stack. I don’t believe it will ever change though because it is just play chips. I’m here for the friendships anyway. lol Winning is a bonus. Good Luck e1!

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I think there are several threads where this has been posted, but I don’t think this is a particularly useful stat. It will vary greatly depending on how many opponents you typically have, and their playing style (calling rates and counter aggression rates will make a huge difference). Still, looks like I’m 19% also.

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! stats

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3 legged donkey
I’ll take the 3 legged Donkey by a nose when All the Chips are on the line and it’s a Big Game :slight_smile:

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|Pots Won:|22% (55,631)|
|At showdown:|44% (24,697)|
|Without showdown:|56% (30,934)|

I use Ctrl + PrtScr to copy the screen, then paste this into my graphics program, crop it, save it, then upload it.

I think Win10 has an easier way to do it, but I don’t use Win!0, so don’t know it.

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I agree with Sue that the most important thing is to have fun and meet friends and I agree with Goat, I play better when it comes to something, against better players! Statistics are nothing really! So what makes you a good poker player, if you ignore all the fundamentals of the game, I think that if you love the game and that you see your opponents with respect, you are a good poker player! If you really want to, you can win against everyone, but you have to love the game, not see the chips, you have to see the cards, your opponents!

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My statistics are:

pots won: 20%
at showdown: 56%
w/o showdown: 44%

The strange thing about these stats since my first year ( which is 9 years now ) my pots won stats has been at 20% almost every year. I don’t recall the showdown %'s.

It would be nice if we could pull up everyone’s profile page and see their stats.

What do you think?

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So I’ve decided to join the sharing circle…

I’ve played 75,525 hands. I’ve won 17,996 pots. Pots won, 24%.
At showdown: 39%
Without Showdown: 61%

More relevant (I think) is the percentage excluding when I fold pre-flop. When I fold pre-flop, did the hand actually happen? Not for me. I’ve seen a flop 38,493 times, and I won that pot 47% of the time.

Given I play pretty much exclusively 9 player S&G tables where before the first card is dealt I have an 11 percent chance of winning, I guess I’m fine with those percentages.

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That also makes me think of another area where percent of pots won loses even more value as a statistic: it doesn’t compare the value of the pots you win to the pots you lose. Imagine two players:

Player 1 is an aggrotard, making giant bets every street with every hand. This player will usually win a very high percentage of pots, but most of the pots they’ll win will be small, while most of the pots they lose will be gigantic (typically their whole stack). So this type of player will typically be in the running for the highest percentage of pots won of any player type, but will also typically top the leader board for most chips lost in big blinds per 100 hands played.

Player 2 is an extreme NIT playing in a weak fishy pool where no one pays any attention to what other players are doing. He goes all in pre-flop every time with AA, and then folds every other hand. This player will win only a tiny fraction of 1% of pots played (0.5% if their aces always held up, but they’ll have many multi-player pots where they won’t even be 50% to win), but in an environment where their pre-flop shoves get called most of the time, they’ll be big winners.

So much more important than the ratio of pots won is the win ratio and frequency of pots of different sizes. It can often be better to win a small number of big pots than a large number of small pots (though of course it is possible to flip that if you get the ratios right, and have enough small wins to cover your big losses).

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All i know is me,win or lose! sometimes i am not there and lose but i am there becuse i love the game! In Saturday i will be there,i will do my best game,fight for my team,want to do my best poker game ever,do the best i can do! Is that not to be a good poker player!!

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I think one can still find value in a statistic such as the pots won %. But, only when the % is calculated after thousands of hands played.

Based on my years of experience, I’m able to create (which I do) a profile of players based on it.

Pots won % at showdown:

Those who win around 60% or greater are very observant of the flow of betting and raises. I feel they have developed that 6th sense when someone has a better or weaker hand than theirs.

Those who win at 40% or lower probably have missed the signs of the strengths of their opponents. Maybe, they are easily fooled or misled.

Pots won % w/o a showdown:

Those who win at 60% or greater are probably aggressive or are playing extremely aggressive at that point. Or, maybe their reputation is helping their play.

Those who win around 40% or lower are probably the most dangerous type of player. They like to take calculated risks and are diabolically cunning. A loose cannon type of player. They are younger than most or at least they still feel younger if they are indeed an older player. Maybe, still living in the past. And, they are probably better than average looking.

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The numbers on the statistics page are about as informative/useful as a tournament ROI number that is predominantly based on freerolls.

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I see what you did there!!

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Another issue with the stats is that they reflect every hand since your first.Those who started here not knowing the game, who have now taken the time and effort to get better, have no way of knowing how they are doing NOW.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m not complaining about the system… it is what it is.

But the stats that would show your growth in the game, month by month, simply aren’t available. Changes made to your current game get watered down by your past games.

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Poker appears to be 90% luck, 5% grasp of probability, 5% grasp of psychology. If you have the last two, this gives you a slight edge.

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All i now is to be a bad player!! Think to much,feel to much,to take the chips to be evil i cant be!

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Take a break and regroup

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I think there’s more good poker players than we assume. You can be a good poker player and not win often as there is a certain amount of luck and scenario that comes into play. Sure navigating luck and circumstance is part of knowing the game, but they aren’t difficult concepts to grasp for the average adult. The truth is any player who does grasp the game’s concept has a chance to win and can be seen as a formidable player. I have had decent luck winning MTTs on Replay and cashed in live tournaments as well, and that makes me a good player. I have demonstrated skill at various times to prove that poker is not something I am guessing at. I am a good poker player. Daniel Negreanu would run circles around me.

Comparing a good poker player to Daniel is not really fair. He isn’t good, or even great. He is an elite poker player. A lot of people who haven’t sat at a table with Daniel probably think they could beat him. If that’s the case, why aren’t they out doing it? Professional poker isn’t an inaccessible game.

I think the first step to moving from “good” to “great” poker player is passion for the game. If you don’t love the game you’ll never push yourself towards significant betting. As much as I love Replay, and my love for NLHE developed on this site, I chose to venture out into more impactful environments to develop my skills further. With some decent live earnings, I am gaining confidence that one day meaningful accolades are not out of the question. I aspire to greatness. But until I have achieved what others have already I cannot consider myself great. Much less at the level of the winningest pros of all time.

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